Hidden on the Mountain:
Stories of Children Sheltered from the Nazis in Le Chambon
by Deborah Durland DeSaix and Karen Gray Ruelle.

GREAT NEWS!!!


HIDDEN ON THE MOUNTAIN has been recognized as a
2008 Notable Book for Teen Readers
by the Sydney Taylor Book Award Committee
of the Association of Jewish Libraries!


THE REVIEWS ARE IN!


KIRKUS, April 1, 2007 *STARRED REVIEW*

"An absolute must."


PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, May 14, 2007

"The heartrending personal accounts contained within this powerful edition should long linger in readers' minds."


SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL, May 2007

". . . the book is an invaluable resource for Holocaust educators, and many of the children's narratives would read beautifully out loud."


THE BULLETIN OF THE CENTER FOR CHILDREN'S BOOKS, September 2007

". . . includes a rich assortment of voices, memories, and details about the war years in this mountainous region."


BOOKLIST, March 15, 2007

DeSaix, Deborah Durland and Ruelle, Karen Gray. Hidden on the Mountain: Stories of Children Sheltered from the Nazis in Le Chambon. Apr. 2007. 304p. illus. Holiday, $24.95 (9780823419289). 940.53. Gr. 6–9.

In this inspiring photo-essay the authors tell an amazing rescue story about a Nazi occupied Protestant community in south-central France that pulled together to save several thousand Jewish children from the Holocaust. Kathy Kacer’s Hiding Edith (2006) tells a similar story from the viewpoint of one child. More detailed, this account is based on extensive research and interviews with 30 survivors and rescuers, who recall in diary style entries how it was. Many readers will focus on the dramatic overviews and commentaries, but the personal details, accompanied by black-and-white photos, are unforgettable, too: living with fear; waiting for a letter (“Why haven’t Mama and Pap sent for me?”); escaping to Switzerland. The research is a big part of the book, and the authors have provided extensive documentation as well as time lines, maps, bibliographies, and source notes that can help researchers find out more. Readers slightly younger and older than the target audience will find this compelling, too. Pair it with Carol Matas’ novelization of the story, Greater than Angels (1998). ––Hazel Rochman